Africa http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/en/tags/429/15/www.peaceau.org/en/page/africasd.iisd.org/news/agenda2063.au.int/en/africasd.iisd.org/news/www.theabujainquirer.com en Empowered Women, Empowering Communities (French, ActionAid Senegal) http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/en/publications/empowered-women-empowering-communities-french-actionaid-senegal <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/en/publications/empowered-women-empowering-communities-french-actionaid-senegal" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/empowered_women_empowering_communities-stories_of_change_fr.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="342" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid Senegal </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/empowered_women_empowering_communities-stories_of_change_fr.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>empowered_women_empowering_communities-stories_of_change_fr.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2018-02-08T00:00:00+00:00">Thursday, February 8, 2018</time></span> </div> Africa Senegal International Thu, 08 Feb 2018 10:15:41 +0000 Rob Safar 714785 at http://www.peuples-solidaires.org Our civic space is shrinking. Here's how we've responded — and you can, too http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/en/2018/02/our-civic-space-shrinking-heres-how-weve-responded-and-you-can-too <div class="field field-image-nid"> <div class="buildmode-embedded_image"> <div class="node node-type-image clear-block"> <div class="nd-region-middle-wrapper nd-no-sidebars" ><div class="nd-region-middle"><div class="field field-image-file"> <a href="/en/2018/02/our-civic-space-shrinking-heres-how-weve-responded-and-you-can-too" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large imagecache-linked imagecache-thumb_large_linked"><img src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/thumb_large/image/xkzxwyrxelhe85gxaqiskh7egriwxpjgptzewzolcupv0cjdi06k6_ybzkqcrylrcvixbj5nfl4sro7xylzu_aiqjfi1by464mjugr95t2xcvnijnvui8wlvdupi6aoc3zzntui.jpg" alt="" title="" width="140" height="140" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large"/></a> </div> </div></div> </div> <!-- /node --> </div> <!-- /buildmode --> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <p>Over the last several months, <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/uganda">ActionAid Uganda</a> has endured attacks by external forces aimed at halting operations and undermining work in communities across the country. What began as a siege on our offices last year on Sept. 20 followed with the freezing of our bank accounts on Oct. 6, and intermittent disruptions to ActionAid Uganda’s work in the field. ActionAid was not the only civil society organization impacted by this onslaught and is unlikely to be the last, but as a direct result of our responses we continue to overcome and support others to do the same.</p><p>ActionAid Uganda and three of its partner organizations were raided by Ugandan Police back by government warrants in September 2017. Raids saw office equipment and possessions confiscated. In our case, all items taken remain with the police. On 6th October ActionAid Uganda’s bank accounts were frozen on allegations of illicit financial transactions, money laundering, conspiracy to commit a felony and supporting subversive activities to destabilize Uganda.</p><p>These attacks have caused immense disruption to our operations. The confiscation of possessions, seemingly inconclusive investigations, freezing of accounts, and halting of activities in the field have cost us program implementation work and distracted us from our mission. We lost income, as potential donors reconsidered projects or processes previously agreed, citing concerns around the safety of grants following the siege. Intense state propaganda portrayed us as a criminal entity investigated for economic crimes. Sections of the media framed us as an antigovernment opposition party disguised as an NGO. It was shocking to hear highly placed officials referring to ActionAid as an organization with a track record of spying for foreign governments. Ongoing claims left our image and reputation damaged and saw sections of the population turn against us.</p><p>Despite these setbacks we have persevered to turn crisis into opportunity, defending our right to be and de-escalating the situation on five fronts.</p><h3>1. Political</h3><p>Openly engaging with relevant government offices, our bank, the Financial Intelligence Authority and Ugandan Police proved we have nothing to hide. ActionAid Uganda submitted all that was demanded of us and reached out to donor allies and individuals familiar with the Ugandan state who helped us access offices ordinarily out of reach. Collaborating with peers and communities, we mobilized signatures from over 17,000 people, petitioning the prime minister to unfreeze our accounts.</p><h3>2. Financial</h3><p>We found creative ways of keeping the office open, financing our basic program activities, staff salaries, and meeting most supplier obligations. Negotiating with tax authorities and maintaining strong relations afforded us a remittance waiver whilst our accounts were frozen, enabling us to avoid unfair fines and expectations. These actions, along with our clean track record, gave tax authorities confidence in the organization and meant we maintained financial probity at the height of the crisis.</p><h3>3. Communications and public relations</h3><p>We kept actively engaged with mainstream media and had a measured presence on social accounts. We responded to government propaganda when useful, and relied on a public statement by our National Governing Board to correct malicious accusations against ActionAid. Behind the scenes, we maintained communication with staff and key constituencies to prevent uncertainty and/or counter state propaganda.</p><h3>4. Legal</h3><p>A prominent legal team familiar with the political landscape prepared a strong case, directly challenging the actions of the Financial Intelligence Authority and Standard Chartered Bank. Through a combination of direct court action and legal discussions, a consensus was reached that contributed to the decision to unfreeze the bank accounts.</p><h3>5. Learning</h3><p>After four turbulent months we’ve emerged stronger with an increased understanding of how to operate in the current landscape. We’ve learnt to be more agile, reaching out to people we wouldn’t ordinarily have contacted, bypassing the usual diplomatic routes. We kept open dialogue with agencies whilst retaining our right to explore other options, such as protesting and litigation. But the most important tool we used following the siege was sidestepping typical NGO structures and instead using a scenario matrix to plan for all eventualities and remain adaptive.</p><p>The road ahead remains slippery, mainly due to the uncertain political future of the country and publicly inconclusive investigations by Ugandan police. But as these attacks continue to try and deter growing citizen resistance against an evolving autocracy in Uganda, ActionAid remains steadfast as an important player in strengthening social justice.</p><p></p><p><em>This article was originally published on <a href="https://www.devex.com/news/opinion-our-civic-space-is-shrinking-here-s-how-we-ve-responded-and-you-can-too-92013">Devex.com</a>.</em></p> </div> http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/en/2018/02/our-civic-space-shrinking-heres-how-weve-responded-and-you-can-too#comments Africa Uganda shrinking political space Governance International Wed, 07 Feb 2018 13:13:43 +0000 arthur.larok 714626 at http://www.peuples-solidaires.org Policy Brief: Incorporation of Women’s Economic Empowerment and Unpaid Care Work into regional polices: Africa http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/en/publications/policy-brief-incorporation-womens-economic-empowerment-and-unpaid-care-work-regional <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/en/publications/policy-brief-incorporation-womens-economic-empowerment-and-unpaid-care-work-regional" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/policy_brief_weeucw_africa_online_version.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="340" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/policy_brief_weeucw_africa_online_version.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>policy_brief_weeucw_africa_online_version.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-07-31T00:00:00+01:00">Monday, July 31, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <h3>Time to start caring – how ignoring Unpaid Care Work is holding back economic empowerment of Africa’s rural women</h3><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Agriculture accounts on average for one third of Africa’s GDP and women make up as much as half of its rural workforce. Given the various commitments made on gender equality, economic development and agricultural policies, African agriculture should be a success story for rural women but this is far from the case. The most obvious challenge is the staggering unequal burden of Unpaid Care Work.</p><p>In response to these challenges this policy briefing was developed as part of ActionAid’s five year multi country POWER project. This is the first in a planned series of policy and research papers. It provides an analysis of the current policies, and practices, across Africa that relate to rural women’s economic empowerment and, in particular, the inclusion of the issue of Unpaid Care Work. It considers the successes and the gaps, and identifies opportunities for improvement. It also seeks to link Unpaid Care Work and women’s economic empowerment with the issue of Violence Against Women.</p> </div> Africa unpaid care work Womens Rights International Thu, 18 Jan 2018 12:37:59 +0000 Rob Safar 713803 at http://www.peuples-solidaires.org Our offices were raided in Uganda - here's what to do if yours are too http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/en/2017/10/our-offices-were-raided-uganda-heres-what-do-if-yours-are-too <div class="field field-image-nid"> <div class="buildmode-embedded_image"> <div class="node node-type-image clear-block"> <div class="nd-region-middle-wrapper nd-no-sidebars" ><div class="nd-region-middle"><div class="field field-image-file"> <a href="/en/2017/10/our-offices-were-raided-uganda-heres-what-do-if-yours-are-too" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large imagecache-linked imagecache-thumb_large_linked"><img src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/thumb_large/image/8zheps49b6kxmhgnurf2pcpts9julpxjk_7prlq_pu0cnmzvvri1m8javi3wx1smuyawdnwkvjs6q2korxfvm1rzvmpy6aj5a91vxwjhqyn5oioqot2vp4ijdcdskwhhymlbzzsh.jpg" alt="" title="" width="140" height="140" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large"/></a> </div> </div></div> </div> <!-- /node --> </div> <!-- /buildmode --> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <p>Last month, police raided the offices of <a class="c6" href="https://www.devex.com/organizations/actionaid-44486">ActionAid Uganda</a>, the <a class="c6" href="https://www.devex.com/organizations/great-lakes-institute-for-strategic-studies-limited-gliss-77834">Great Lakes Institute</a>&nbsp;(GLISS), and <a class="c6" href="http://solidarityuganda.org/">Solidarity Uganda</a>. More raids on the offices of other NGOs have since followed. Every indication is that we should prepare for a long, drawn-out attack on Ugandan civil society.</p><p>Uganda is one of a growing number of countries experiencing a closing of civic space, putting at risk human rights defenders and the communities we serve and protect. The <a class="c6" href="https://monitor.civicus.org">Civicus Monitor</a>&nbsp;offers a disturbing depiction of the state of civic space globally, with the latest developments in Uganda earning the country a rating of “repressed” — one category above “closed,” in a five-category rating system.</p><p>In this instance, the offices of ActionAid Uganda, GLISS, and Solidarity Uganda were raided by police in a cordon and search operation. At ActionAid, staff were prevented from leaving for several hours as police thoroughly searched the premises; removing documents and confiscating phones and laptops. The search warrant claimed that all three organizations were involved in “illicit financial transactions” and “subversive activities to destabilize Uganda.” The severity of these accusations and subsequent raids on other NGOs indicate that an attack on civil society is underway.</p><p>As this encroachment continues, I reflect on possible motives behind these recent attacks; what they might mean for the future; and what lessons we can learn, as we prepare for further threats.</p><p>The office raid appears to be part of a wider crackdown on legitimate protests against the plan to remove the presidential age limit from the Ugandan Constitution, thus allowing the current president to remain in power indefinitely.</p><h3>We think these attacks have ulterior motives.</h3><ol><li><strong>To delegitimize civil society</strong>. Police raids on our offices immediately present us as subversive elements. This could affect our public image, and that of civil society in general. It could also scare away our funding partners and threaten the stability of our work.</li><li><strong>To compromise our systems and information</strong>. These attacks disrupt our work, and potentially sow seeds for future surveillance by targeting our communications systems and infrastructure.</li><li><strong>To disrupt and derail us from our mission</strong>. Part of our mission as civil society is to help articulate public positions. We are opposed to regressive constitutional amendments. We will invest in organizing citizens to resist attempts to remove the age-limit, even though we know this puts us in direct conflict with the ruling party.</li><li><strong>To threaten and demoralize civil society</strong>. In the hopes of driving us into self-censorship, weakening our resolve, and preventing us from tackling injustice.</li><li><strong>To provide a justification for further action</strong>. Such as halting activities of civil society under the pretext that investigations are still ongoing. We have already seen this happening in the case of ActionAid, where two field activities have been halted by the police.</li></ol><p>What can we learn from these attacks and what should civil society do to defend ourselves in ongoing efforts to protect civic space? How can we ensure that we are not derailed in our mission to tackle injustice and poverty?</p><h3>Here are some tips if your office is at risk of being raided.<strong> </strong></h3><ol><li><strong>Always keep your house in order. </strong>You must update and back up all institutional information and documentation. During the impromptu siege, the police demanded documents without delay. If we had failed to do so, it may have caused unnecessary suspicion.</li><li><strong>Staff and board members must understand all processes in the organization. </strong>If interrogated, we do not want colleagues to inadvertently arouse suspicion by saying inconsistent things about how we organize ourselves and what our business processes are.</li><li><strong>Rapid legal response is necessary. </strong>As civic and political space continues to shrink in Uganda and globally, we must strengthen our legal response capabilities. The presence of competent lawyers is extremely important.</li><li><strong>A positive relationship with the media is essential. </strong>The media were very helpful in reporting the siege — and established relations meant they did so in a manner that was both supportive and objective. Social media platforms were of increased importance during this crisis, and future investment here is key.</li><li><strong>Being relevant to civil society and wider citizens’ struggles. </strong>The immense show of solidarity from other civil society organizations, politicians, and the public at our time of need demonstrated our value and relevance to civil society. The more outward looking an NGO, the more likely it is to receive much-needed solidarity from others. We were able to call upon our supporters both in Uganda and across the world to amplify our voice and provide solidarity.<strong></strong></li><li><strong>Beware of potential informers. </strong>Finally, we have learned that the forces that seek to undermine our work are in our midst. It is therefore important to better understand our internal environment and partners with whom we work. We must remain vigilant and transparent and have the confidence to defend what we stand for.</li></ol><p>The threat to civil society is far-reaching. We must learn from these attacks and work together to protect and defend the legitimacy and effectiveness of the work that we do.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><em>This article was originally published on <a href="https://www.devex.com/news/opinion-our-offices-were-raided-in-uganda-here-s-what-to-do-if-yours-are-too-91288">Devex.com</a>.</em></p> </div> http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/en/2017/10/our-offices-were-raided-uganda-heres-what-do-if-yours-are-too#comments Africa Uganda shrinking political space Governance International Wed, 18 Oct 2017 10:41:40 +0000 arthur.larok 710278 at http://www.peuples-solidaires.org Agroecology and Resilience Project Stories of Change (ActionAid Senegal) http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/en/publications/agroecology-and-resilience-project-stories-change-actionaid-senegal <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/en/publications/agroecology-and-resilience-project-stories-change-actionaid-senegal" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/aerstoriesofchange.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="114" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid Senegal </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/aerstoriesofchange.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>aerstoriesofchange.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-09-21T00:00:00+01:00">Thursday, September 21, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p><div class="ibimage-with-caption null" style="width:555px;"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_content_fullwidth/image/dsc00091.jpg" alt="File 38293" title="" width="555" height="369" class="ibimage"/><span class="ibimage-caption">Weather Information System Helps Avoid Farming Losses in Bakho. Photo: Jenna Farineau, ActionAid USA</span></div></p> </div> Africa Senegal Food & land rights International Thu, 21 Sep 2017 09:42:30 +0000 Rob Safar 708723 at http://www.peuples-solidaires.org Agroecology and Resilience Project Brochure (ActionAid Senegal) http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/en/publications/agroecology-and-resilience-project-brochure-actionaid-senegal <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/en/publications/agroecology-and-resilience-project-brochure-actionaid-senegal" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/aerbrochure.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="185" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid Senegal </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/aerbrochure.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>aerbrochure.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-09-21T00:00:00+01:00">Thursday, September 21, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p><div class="ibimage-with-caption null" style="width:555px;"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_content_fullwidth/image/dsc00432.jpg" alt="File 38292" title="" width="555" height="416" class="ibimage"/><span class="ibimage-caption">Improving the food security of vulnerable communities. Photo: Djiby Sow, ActionAid Senegal</span></div></p> </div> Africa Senegal Food & land rights International Thu, 21 Sep 2017 09:41:26 +0000 Rob Safar 708722 at http://www.peuples-solidaires.org Tax, privatisation and the right to education: Influencing education financing and tax policy to transform children’s lives. http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/en/publications/tax-privatisation-and-right-education-influencing-education-financing-and-tax-policy-tr <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/en/publications/tax-privatisation-and-right-education-influencing-education-financing-and-tax-policy-tr" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/tax_privatisation_and_the_right_to_education_with_blank_pages_after_edits_with_adobe_pro.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="340" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-summary"> <a href="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/international_-_tax_privatisation_and_rte_report_-_summary_-_29.01.18.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>international_-_tax_privatisation_and_rte_report_-_summary_-_29.01.18.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/tax_privatisation_report_online.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>tax_privatisation_report_online.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-09-01T00:00:00+01:00">Friday, September 1, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>The current report is the synthesis of the participatory research carried out as part of the Tax, Privatisation and Right to Education multi country project, and is based on the national reports produced by ActionAid in Ghana, Kenya, Uganda and Pakistan respectively. It aims to shed light on how much families pay for education in these four countries and how these direct and indirect fees could be eliminated to enable access to education.</p><p>Findings signal that families have to pay a high percentage (ranging from 6.9% in Pakistan to 33.7% in Uganda for public schools, and 25% to 173% respectively for private schools) of their income in terms of schools related costs, even when public schools are supposed to be free at primary level in these four countries. Despite these costs, when all fees and levies are taken into account, private schools tend to be between 3 and 5 times even more expensive than public schools.</p><p>Yet, because of the lack of adequate financing, partly due to governments giving away excessive tax incentives and not curbing tax evasion, the perceived declining quality of public education in these four countries is pushing families to make hard choices to find other alternatives. Private schools are growing as a result of this demand and the lack of effective regulation, creating and entrenching social inequalities and leading to the stigmatisation of public education.</p> </div> Africa Ghana Kenya Pakistan Uganda Asia Tax Justice Education Governance International Fri, 01 Sep 2017 13:40:18 +0000 Rob Safar 707484 at http://www.peuples-solidaires.org The wrong model for resilience: How G7-backed drought insurance failed Malawi, and what we must learn from it http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/en/publications/wrong-model-resilience-how-g7-backed-drought-insurance-failed-malawi-and-what-we-must-l <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/en/publications/wrong-model-resilience-how-g7-backed-drought-insurance-failed-malawi-and-what-we-must-l" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/the_wrong_model_for_resilience_final_180517.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="340" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> Jonathan Reeves, ActionAid UK </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/the_wrong_model_for_resilience_final_230517.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>the_wrong_model_for_resilience_final_230517.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-05-24T00:00:00+01:00">Wednesday, May 24, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>The G7-backed African Risk Capacity (ARC) drought insurance policy was an <strong>experiment that failed Malawi</strong>, and <strong>in particular its women</strong>, in the face of a drought that need not have become a disaster. The insurance, for which Malawi paid US$5 million(m), failed to deliver on its promise of timely assistance, which 6.7m food-insecure Malawians so sorely needed, due to <strong>major defects in the model, data and process</strong> used to determine a pay-out. After the declaration of a national emergency in April 2016, uproar at ARC’s decision that no pay-out was warranted was eventually followed by agreement in November to pay Malawi $8m. But this payment, made only in January 2017, was <strong>too little, too late</strong> and effectively represented an economic loss to Malawi. In the meantime, the Government was left pursuing conventional means of raising money to buy food for its hungry citizens, with the total drought response costs estimated at $395m.</p><p>This technical failure has brought home to Malawian policymakers and stakeholders the more fundamental <strong>poor value for money</strong> of the drought insurance model so strongly promoted by the G7, the World Bank and other powerful development actors, and how their scarce resources could better be spent. <strong>Not one of the government officials with key roles in climate risk management or other expert national stakeholders we spoke to would choose to renew the insurance policy</strong>. Instead, they would use the money for no-regrets adaptation and resilience-building options that are proven to work but severely under- resourced. They would invest in making their <strong>social protection</strong> system more integrated, scalable, adaptive and universal; or supporting more <strong>climate-resilient, sustainable agriculture</strong> and more <strong>irrigation</strong>; or adequately resourcing <strong>decentralised disaster risk reduction</strong> (DRR) and enhancing the network of <strong>weather stations</strong>; or saving at least some of the money each year in a <strong>contingency fund</strong> for disasters.</p><p>The women farmers we spoke to additionally called for more <strong>inclusive extension services</strong> and more <strong>training in how to run their popular village savings and loans schemes</strong> (VSLs) and potentially grow them into cooperatives. They were unfamiliar with insurance and wary of financial institutions. They were already using a form of risk management through the emergency fund in their VSLs, but needed support to expand this.</p> </div> Africa Malawi Emergencies & Conflict International Wed, 24 May 2017 11:00:00 +0000 Rob Safar 700260 at http://www.peuples-solidaires.org Charter of Demands: Actualizing women's land rights in Africa http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/en/publications/charter-demands-actualizing-womens-land-rights-africa <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/en/publications/charter-demands-actualizing-womens-land-rights-africa" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/english_charter_to_print_final.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="331" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> Women to Kilimanjaro, ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/english_charter_to_print_final.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>english_charter_to_print_final.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-03-29T00:00:00+01:00">Wednesday, March 29, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>The Kilimanjaro Initiative is a rural women’s mobilisation from across Africa towards an iconic moment at the foot of Mt Kilimanjaro in October 2016. The Kilimanjaro Initiative was conceived when, we the Rural Women of Africa with support from civil society, met in Dar es Salaam in 2012. This initiative aims to create space for us to be able to participate in decision making processes about land and natural resources.</p><p>With 2016 declared by the 26th African Union Summit as “Africa Year of Human Rights with particular focus on the Rights of Women”, coupled with the transition from MDGs into SDGs, our quest for actualization of our right to land and natural resources towards a food and nutritional secure continent could have never been timelier.</p><p>Also noting that in October 2015, the AU Special Technical Committee on agriculture, water and environ- ment recommended that Member States allocate at least 30% of land to women; improve land rights of women through legislative/other mechanisms, in order to give prac- tical effect to the AU declaration on Land in which all African states committed to ensure equitable access to land for all land users and strengthen women’s land rights. The women have therefore pro- claimed this Charter of principles and demands specifically on women’s access to use, control, own, inherit and dispose their land and natural resources.</p><p>Download the Charter in:</p><ul><li><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/english_charter_to_print_final.pdf">English</a></li><li><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/french_charter_to_print_final.pdf">French</a></li><li><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/portuguese_charter_to_print_final.pdf">Portuguese</a></li><li><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/swahili_charter_to_print.pdf">Swahili</a></li></ul> </div> Africa Food & land rights International Wed, 29 Mar 2017 12:30:00 +0000 Rob Safar 696618 at http://www.peuples-solidaires.org Young Urban Women: Exploring Interlinkages: Bodily Integrity, Economic Security and Equitable Distribution of Unpaid Care Work http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/en/publications/young-urban-women-exploring-interlinkages-bodily-integrity-economic-security-and-equita <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/en/publications/young-urban-women-exploring-interlinkages-bodily-integrity-economic-security-and-equita" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/youngurbanwomen2017-page-001.jpg" alt="" title="" width="240" height="339" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/youngurbanwomen2017.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>youngurbanwomen2017.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2015-11-30T00:00:00+00:00">Monday, November 30, 2015</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>ActionAid and its partners have, since 2013, been working to address the issues of bodily integrity and economic security among approximately 5800 young women in the age group of 15- 25 years in seven cities in Ghana, South Africa and India through the ‘Young Urban Women: Life Choices and Livelihoods’ programme. The programme is deliberate in its urban framing and targetingdue to the reality of rapid urbanisation in Africa and Asia, which is believed to have great potential for youth employment and better access to public services, but which often sets the stage for discrimination and exploitation, particularly among poor urban populations. Between May and August 2015, the programmecommissioned a research aimed at creating a better understanding about the linkages between young urban women’s sexual and reproductive health and rights and their economic rights – including their burden of unpaid care work and access to decent work. Through this research, the programme set out to break the trend of looking at economic livelihoods on one hand and sexual and reproductive health and rights on the other hand in isolation, failing to recognize how these intersect in women’s everyday lives. In addition, unpaid care work intersects with and greatly impacts both these areas and therefore needs to be included in creating a more holistic impact on the lives of young urban women. In the course of implementing the programme, it became clear that lack of sexual and reproductive health and rights, and the disproportionate burden of unpaid care work on young women greatly impacted their wellbeing, agency and access to decent work. Further, young women who were in paid employment did not see a notable change in their burden of unpaid care work.</p><p>A total of 96 young women in Accra, Johannesburg and Hyderabad took part in the research, which was designed as peer-to-peer in order to encourage them to tell their own stories while building their knowledge and skills around analysing their lives, voicing concern and proposing solutions. Across the research sites, the interlinkages between bodily integrity, economic security and unpaid care responsibilities were not linear, but rather multifaceted andcomplex.</p> </div> Africa Ghana India South Africa Asia unpaid care work Womens Rights International Tue, 28 Feb 2017 12:00:54 +0000 paul.griffiths 692882 at http://www.peuples-solidaires.org