Food &amp; land rights http://www.actionaid.org/tags/429/11 en No Place To Go: How unregulated investments are worsening land, gender and food security inequalities in South East Asia http://www.actionaid.org/publications/no-place-go-how-unregulated-investments-are-worsening-land-gender-and-food-security <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/no-place-go-how-unregulated-investments-are-worsening-land-gender-and-food-security" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/policy_brief_layout_hires_11_27_17_final.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="332" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid, AsiaDHRRA, Oxfam </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/policy_brief_layout_hires_11_27_17_final.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>policy_brief_layout_hires_11_27_17_final.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-12-06T00:00:00+00:00">Wednesday, December 6, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>Leaders from Southeast Asia are meeting in Manila in November 2017 to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). ASEAN leaders will have the chance to reflect on the region's economic development plan - central to the creation of the ASEAN Economic Community - and consider its impact on peoples across the region. They have an opportunity to redefine the idea of regional economic cooperation as less about trade, investment, and liberalization, and more about creating a regional economy where women enjoy the same economic rights&nbsp; and opportunities as men, where everyone-not only the rich-gains from economic progress, and where economic growth is not achieved at the expense of the environment.</p><p>Like many regional blocs, ASEAN aspires to be an economic powerhouse by becoming a vital link in the glob al supply chain. In line with this, ASEAN began implementing a host of policies as early as the 1990s to facilitate trade and to attract foreign direct investments (FDI) into the region, with some success. ASEAN trade with the world rose from USD 1.61 trillion in 2007 to USD 2.53 trillion in 2014.1 FDI flows to the region increased from USD 10 8.1 billion in 2010 to USD 1 29.9 billion in 2014.</p><p>Although these high rates have since dropped, what remains is the impact of this economic model on women and marginalised groups living in the region. Unregulated private sector investment affects women, peoples' access and right to land, and the climate and the environment. Without safeguards, private sector&nbsp; investments tend to perpetuate&nbsp; gender&nbsp; wage gaps and lead to &nbsp;disinvestment&nbsp; in public services, which increases women's unpaid care work burden . This, in turn, limits women's life choices and exacerbates gender inequality.&nbsp; Unregulated investments chip away at communities' access to land, and the drive for increased economic output uses up natural resources.&nbsp; Investment s affect segments of society differently; it is marginalised groups living in precarious&nbsp; contexts that are the&nbsp; worst affected. Inequality is no longer just about disparities in income and wealth. It also pertains to the very lack of economic opportunities and the inability of marginalised people to influence and participate in decisions affecting them.</p><p>This policy brief summarises the impact of the ASEAN's economic model on gender inequality, land rights, and climate; and offers recommendations for ASEAN to help it eradicate poverty and inequality, in keeping with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and with other human rights agreements.</p> </div> Asia Food & land rights Womens Rights International Wed, 06 Dec 2017 13:57:10 +0000 Rob Safar 713169 at http://www.actionaid.org Responsible governance of tenure must be gender sensitive http://www.actionaid.org/2017/11/responsible-governance-tenure-must-be-gender-sensitive <div class="field field-image-nid"> <div class="buildmode-embedded_image"> <div class="node node-type-image clear-block"> <div class="nd-region-middle-wrapper nd-no-sidebars" ><div class="nd-region-middle"><div class="field field-image-file"> <a href="/2017/11/responsible-governance-tenure-must-be-gender-sensitive" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large imagecache-linked imagecache-thumb_large_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/thumb_large/image/190936.jpg" alt="" title="" width="140" height="140" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large"/></a> </div> </div></div> </div> <!-- /node --> </div> <!-- /buildmode --> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <p>The livelihoods of hundreds of millions of people, particularly the rural poor, are heavily dependent on secure and equitable access to and control over land and natural resources which are in turn the source of food and shelter, the basis for social, cultural and religious practices, and a central factor in economic growth.</p><p>While each country’s unique tenure system and challenges require tailored responses, there is a need common across most countries, for substantial investments in land governance, management and administration, as well as more focused work to address those sections of society whose tenure rights are the weakest. This particularly applies to marginalized communities- women, small-scale food producers and indigenous groups.</p><p>The Voluntary Guidelines on the responsible Governance of Tenure of land, forest and fisheries- VGGTs, together with the AU Framework and Guidelines for land policy in Africa- AU F&amp;G, both provide progressive internationally accepted principles and norms for defining policies and practice for governance of tenure that particularly safeguard the interests of the poor and marginalized land dependent sections of society.&nbsp; To give effect to these guidelines, ActionAid developed <em>a </em><em>Toolkit for assessing gender-sensitive implementation of the VGGTs and the AU F&amp;G at country-level</em>. The toolkit was piloted in four countries- Senegal, the Gambia, Netherlands and Australia, with key lessons emerging and captured in this report.</p><p>At ActionAid, we believe that strategies aimed at achieving the following principle are key to achieving the right governance of tenure that can be termed as responsible</p><h3>1: Inclusive multi-stakeholder platforms</h3><p>Multi-stakeholder platforms are encouraged in the VGGTs as the recommended approach to the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the Guidelines, in order to ensure participation, collaboration, transparency and accountability in these efforts. Multi-stakeholder platforms may be established at multiple levels and should be gender-sensitive and particularly involve representatives of marginalized and vulnerable groups. The AU F&amp;G recommends participatory process in the “design of land policy&nbsp; formulation and implementation strategies” <strong></strong></p><h3>2: Recognition of customary rights and informal tenure</h3><p>One of the principal tenets of the VGGTs is the recognition of all existing legitimate forms of tenure, both formal and informal, very key for indigenous peoples and marginalized&nbsp; communities. The VGGTs call on states to provide <em>appropriate recognition and protection of the legitimate tenure rights of indigenous peoples and other communities with customary tenure systems</em> and to adapt their policy, legal, and organizational frameworks to recognize such tenure systems. Similarly, the AU F&amp;G advocates for the recognition of the “legitimacy of indigenous land rights’’ and calls for consultation and participation in policy processes, by those who have legitimate tenure rights that could be affected by policy decisions.&nbsp;</p><h3>3: Gender Equality</h3><p>The VGGTs include Gender Equality as one of the principles essential to responsible governance of tenure, and calls on States to ensure that women and girls have equal tenure rights independent of their civil and marital status. The AU F&amp;G recognizes that “gender discrimination” is pervasive in Africa and that there is need for women’s land rights to be strengthened, regardless of their marital status.</p><h3>4: Protection from land grabs</h3><p>The VGGTs offer several recommendations on measures that States can take to prevent loss of legitimate tenure rights resulting from large-scale land acquisitions, as per the human rights principles. <em>State should provide safeguards to protect legitimate tenure rights, human rights, livelihoods, food security and the environment </em>from risks associated with large-scale land acquisitions. Similarly, the AU F&amp;G note that enhanced agricultural exports could lead to increased state revenue, implying a bias towards large-scale commercial agriculture. As a safeguard, the Guiding Principles for Large Scale Land Acquisition also adopted by the AU&nbsp; stress the need for all land-based investment decisions to respect human rights, including customary rights and the rights of women.</p><h3>5: Effective Land Administration</h3><p>A continuing challenge in many countries is the absence of effective institutions, land registries and community action for land management. The VGGTs provide multiple recommendations about land administration to increase land tenure security of small-scale food producers. <em>“States should provide systems… to record individual and collective tenure rights in order to improve security of tenure rights.” </em>For effective land administration, both the VGGTs and the F&amp;G advocate for policy implementing agencies to ensure that policies and laws are effective and gender sensitive manner.</p><h3>6: Conflict resolution mechanisms</h3><p>Independent, reliable and effective conflict resolution mechanisms are key to ensuring justice and land tenure security of the poor, particularly women. The VGGTs promote the development of appropriate and effective alternative forms of dispute resolution, while the F&amp;G advocates for the “prevention of conflict” and “resolution through mutually acceptable dispute processing mechanisms” and strengthening conflict resolution methods.</p><p>We now have an excellent toolkit to help CSOs and communities assess how these key principles are being implemented at country and local levels. In this toolkit are 3 interrelated, yet independent tools focusing on:</p><ul><li><strong>Tool 1</strong> looks at records the policy and legal framework currently in place.&nbsp;</li><li><strong>Tool 2</strong> to assess how the legal and regulatory frameworks are operational and implemented at the local level; and</li><li><strong>Tool 3</strong> Assesses implementation of the VGGTs in foreign policy and donor relations for OECD countries</li></ul><p>In piloting these tools, some interesting lessons emerged from Senegal, the Gambia, Netherlands and Australia. It emerged that prior training is really useful in helping the communities do the analysis and have an understanding of their rights to participate in land governance. The assessment<strong> </strong>provided communities with an opportunity to learn on the use of the tool at the same help them to understand tenure systems and how it affects them. For this, translation of the guidelines and the tools in languages appropriate for communities is key.</p><p>Similarly, the systems and institutions in place had problems implementing the two guidelines and the training and analysis helps these institutions to understand their duties (based on commitments they have made internationally towards these guidelines). &nbsp;The Gambia Government for example recognized the challenges inherent in the traditional land tenure regimes, which does not give space for women to fully participate in decision making regarding land administration.&nbsp; However, the tool provides great potential for women to engage government to demand for their rights.</p><p>Sharing findings with CSO appreciated as the tools can be used to enhance the relationship with the state and the communities in order to improve land governance. &nbsp;</p><p>The policy level assessment helps to make concrete recommendations on what these policies should contain. As such, It was useful to engage with the government to clarify issues related to such policies, and respond to concerns for example why we are very particular about customary tenure as well as gender</p><p>The nexus between international trade and land rights also emerged . Trade has a potential effect on land laws, particularly where there are Investment State Dispute Settlement provisions in trade agreements.&nbsp; Similarly, extractive activities have potential to lead to loss of tenure rights for women and communities,although, both guidelines do not cover the governance of mines and mineral.</p><p>It was also clear that we have to address the close link between land and natural resource rights (the complexity of it all).</p><p><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/publications/VGGT-toolkit-2017">Find the toolkit here</a>, and <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/publications/VGGT-report-2017">the assessment report here.</a></p> </div> http://www.actionaid.org/2017/11/responsible-governance-tenure-must-be-gender-sensitive#comments Food & land rights Governance Womens Rights International Thu, 16 Nov 2017 22:00:00 +0000 catherine.gatundu 711688 at http://www.actionaid.org Assessment Toolkit: Assessing gender-sensitive implementation and country-level monitoring of the Tenure Governance and Africa Land Policy Guidelines http://www.actionaid.org/publications/VGGT-toolkit-2017 <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/VGGT-toolkit-2017" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/aa_vggt_toolkit_single_pages.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="340" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/aa_vggt_toolkit_single_pages.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>aa_vggt_toolkit_single_pages.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-11-08T00:00:00+00:00">Wednesday, November 8, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>Secure tenure over land, fisheries and forests is central to global efforts to end poverty and hunger in local communities (and in particular among indigenous peoples and women), and to ensure sustainable management of the environment. Tenure security has also been affirmed as a great contributor to ending poverty and hunger in the world under the Sustainable Development Goal. The livelihoods of hundreds of millions of people, particularly the rural poor, indigenous peoples and women, depend on secure and equitable rights to natural resources, which are their primary sources of food and shelter; the basis for social, cultural and religious practices; and a core economic asset. Yet often, indigenous peoples and women are excluded from the governance of these resources.</p><p>ActionAid International has been working over the last few years with women and rural communities to challenge commercialization of land, which leads to loss of their rights to and control over land and other resources. The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of tenure of land, forest and Fisheries - VGGTs, together with the AU Framework and Guidelines for land policy in Africa - AU F&amp;G, both provide progressive internationally accepted principles and norms for defining policies and practice for governance of tenure that particularly safeguard the interests of the poor and marginalized land dependent sections of society.</p><p>To contribute to the push for their comprehensive implementation, ActionAid developed a Toolkit for assessing gender-sensitive implementation of the VGGTs and the AU F&amp;G at country-level. This Toolkit aims to:</p><ul><li>monitor country implementation of the VGGT and AU F&amp;G, with a focus on women and small-scale food producers and rural, agricultural communities;</li><li>incorporate community empowerment and capacity-building to enhance communities’ understanding of the VGGT and AU F&amp;G (and related land frameworks), and build their capacity to advocate for VGGT implementation;</li><li>build understanding of how Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries support and align their actions with the VGGT as they relate to foreign aid, trade and investment programmes that impact on tenure governance in other countries;</li><li>enable concise presentation of results of VGGT implementation as a basis for cross-country comparison, and for tracking changes over time.</li></ul><p>This gender-sensitive toolkit enables civil society organisations (CSOs), women and communities, as well as other actors to assess each country’s current legal framework and tenure governance arrangements in line with the provisions of the VGGTS and the AU F&amp;G.</p><p>Where it has been piloted, the Toolkit has also proved to be valuable in building communities and other stakeholders’ capacity and understanding and internalization of the VGGTs towards responsible land tenure governance. We therefore hope you will also find the toolkit useful.</p> </div> Food & land rights International Wed, 08 Nov 2017 12:56:46 +0000 Rob Safar 711629 at http://www.actionaid.org Assessing implementation of the Voluntary Tenure Guidelines and the AU Framework and Guidelines for Land Policy: A toolkit approach http://www.actionaid.org/publications/VGGT-report-2017 <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/VGGT-report-2017" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/aa_vggt_report_single_pages.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="340" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/aa_vggt_report_single_pages.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>aa_vggt_report_single_pages.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-11-08T00:00:00+00:00">Wednesday, November 8, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>Access to and control over land and natural resources is crucial to people’s livelihoods and to ensuring secure livelihoods, their rights to food, water, work, housing and a healthy environment. Governments and donor institutions have the opportunity and responsibility to ensure that their policies and actions contribute to the recognition and respect of these rights.</p><p>ActionAid International has been working over the last few years with women and rural communities to challenge commercialization of land, which leads to loss of their rights to land. The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of tenure of land, forest and Fisheries - VGGTs, together with the AU Framework and Guidelines for land policy in Africa - AU F&amp;G, both provide progressive internationally accepted principles and norms for defining policies and practice for governance of tenure that particularly safeguard the interests of the poor and marginalized land dependent sections of society.</p><p>To give effect to these guidelines, ActionAid developed a Toolkit for assessing gender-sensitive implementation of the VGGTs and the AU F&amp;G at country-level. The toolkit was piloted in four countries: Senegal, the Gambia, Netherlands and Australia, with key lessons emerging and captured in this report.</p><p>We hope that this report and lessons herein will encourage greater participatory policy and practice changes that will support women’s and communities’ secure access to and control over land across land tenure regimes. It is only if governments and their agencies embrace and demonstrate political will for stakeholder participation in responsible governance of tenure through policy and practice, and if they champion and take a feminist perspective on land issues, that the Sustainable Development Goals call that no one is to be left behind shall be realized.</p> </div> Food & land rights International Wed, 08 Nov 2017 12:51:41 +0000 Rob Safar 711627 at http://www.actionaid.org Agroecology, Empowerment and Resilience: Lessons from ActionAid's Agroecology and Resilience project http://www.actionaid.org/publications/agroecology-empowerment-and-resilience-lessons-actionaids-agroecology-and-resilience-pr <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/agroecology-empowerment-and-resilience-lessons-actionaids-agroecology-and-resilience-pr" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/agroecologyempowermentresilience-lessons_from_aer.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="340" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/agroecologyempowermentresilience-lessons_from_aer.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>agroecologyempowermentresilience-lessons_from_aer.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-10-05T00:00:00+01:00">Thursday, October 5, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>West Africa is highly vulnerable to climate change impacts. Following a severe drought in the region in 2012, ActionAid initiated the Agroecology and Resilience (AER) project in Senegal and The Gambia, with funding from the US-based MAC Foundation. With an emphasis on women’s empowerment, agroecology and disaster risk reduction strategies, the project works to strengthen communities’ own capacity to analyse the challenges they face and to create change.</p><p>The project began in 2013. Since then, the region has continued to face the escalating impacts of climate change including drought, late rains, flooding, as well as rising sea levels and increased salinity in coastal, island and river estuary areas. These challenges have tested the project, showing its many achievements, and providing lessons on areas that can be further strengthened.</p><p>A mid-term review of the AER project provides key lessons for the wider ActionAid federation and other actors seeking to build resilience to climate change.</p> </div> Climate Change Food & land rights International Thu, 05 Oct 2017 13:10:16 +0000 Rob Safar 709185 at http://www.actionaid.org Agroecology and Resilience Project Stories of Change (ActionAid Senegal) http://www.actionaid.org/publications/agroecology-and-resilience-project-stories-change-actionaid-senegal <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/agroecology-and-resilience-project-stories-change-actionaid-senegal" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/aerstoriesofchange.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="114" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid Senegal </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/aerstoriesofchange.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>aerstoriesofchange.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-09-21T00:00:00+01:00">Thursday, September 21, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p><div class="ibimage-with-caption null" style="width:555px;"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_content_fullwidth/image/dsc00091.jpg" alt="File 38293" title="" width="555" height="369" class="ibimage"/><span class="ibimage-caption">Weather Information System Helps Avoid Farming Losses in Bakho. Photo: Jenna Farineau, ActionAid USA</span></div></p> </div> Africa Senegal Food & land rights International Thu, 21 Sep 2017 09:42:30 +0000 Rob Safar 708723 at http://www.actionaid.org Agroecology and Resilience Project Brochure (ActionAid Senegal) http://www.actionaid.org/publications/agroecology-and-resilience-project-brochure-actionaid-senegal <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/agroecology-and-resilience-project-brochure-actionaid-senegal" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/aerbrochure.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="185" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid Senegal </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/aerbrochure.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>aerbrochure.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-09-21T00:00:00+01:00">Thursday, September 21, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p><div class="ibimage-with-caption null" style="width:555px;"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_content_fullwidth/image/dsc00432.jpg" alt="File 38292" title="" width="555" height="416" class="ibimage"/><span class="ibimage-caption">Improving the food security of vulnerable communities. Photo: Djiby Sow, ActionAid Senegal</span></div></p> </div> Africa Senegal Food & land rights International Thu, 21 Sep 2017 09:41:26 +0000 Rob Safar 708722 at http://www.actionaid.org What can we learn from Ecofeminism? http://www.actionaid.org/2017/07/what-can-we-learn-ecofeminism <div class="field field-image-nid"> <div class="buildmode-embedded_image"> <div class="node node-type-image clear-block"> <div class="nd-region-middle-wrapper nd-no-sidebars" ><div class="nd-region-middle"><div class="field field-image-file"> <a href="/2017/07/what-can-we-learn-ecofeminism" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large imagecache-linked imagecache-thumb_large_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/thumb_large/image/photo_17_solange_at_her_plantation.jpg" alt="" title="" width="140" height="140" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large"/></a> </div> </div></div> </div> <!-- /node --> </div> <!-- /buildmode --> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <p><em>by Ana Paula, Bratindi Jena, &amp; Ruchi Tripathi</em></p><p>Is there a more symbiotic way for human beings to interact with nature? And, perhaps just as important, how can we progress towards it together?</p><p>There is almost little need to illustrate&nbsp;<em>that</em>&nbsp;we are falling short of such an aim across the world. But in such illustrations we can begin to see&nbsp;<em>how</em>, and how some of the underlying or accompanying systems are functioning.&nbsp;</p><p>Recent battles around&nbsp;<a href="http://www.reuters.com/article/us-north-dakota-pipeline-idUSKBN13S09W">oil pipelines in the USA</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/mar/02/thousands-to-march-protest-coal-plant-threat-bangladeshs-sundarbans-forest">coal power plants in Bangladesh</a>, and&nbsp;<a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/apr/22/brazil-amazon-dam-project-suspended-indigenous-munduruku-sao-luiz-do-tapajos">hydroelectric in Brazil</a>&nbsp;demonstrate a clash of values. The prevalence of indigenous people at the forefront of these struggles shows that the violations of colonialism are still ongoing. Pope Francis, in a meeting with indigenous leaders in Rome, highlighted&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ifad.org/newsroom/press_release/tags/p16/y2017/39967919">the need to reconcile development with the protection of indigenous peoples and their territories</a>, “especially when planning economic activities that may interfere with their cultures and their ancestral relationship to the earth”.</p><p>Ecofeminism is one school of thought that has been guiding environmental and feminist movements since the 1970s in various parts of the world, looking at the intersections and relationships between the domination of nature and the domination of women.&nbsp;<strong>The ideological separation of humanity and nature, itself influenced by patriarchal and colonial ideals, has enabled a model of society and development where women and nature both are subjects of objectification and domination.</strong></p><h2>Ecofeminism in practice</h2><p>Author and environmental activist Vandana Shiva points out that women in subsistence economies, who produce “wealth in partnership with nature, have been experts in their own right of holistic and ecological knowledge of nature’s processes” (<em>Staying Alive: Women, ecology and development</em>, 1988). However, “these alternative modes of knowing, which are oriented to the social benefits and sustenance needs are not recognized by the capitalist reductionist paradigm, because it fails to perceive the interconnectedness of nature, or the connection of women’s lives, work and knowledge with the creation of wealth” (<em>Ibid.</em>).</p><p>Nobel prize winner and leading ecofeminist Wangari Maathai&nbsp;<a href="http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/2004/maathai-lecture-text.html">credits the start of the Green Belt Movement</a>&nbsp;to responding to the needs of rural women; needs including firewood, clean drinking water, balanced diets, shelter and income; and also as a confrontation with development policies that marginalise women. Prof. Maathai, like Dr. Shiva, recognises the role of women in Africa as primary caretakers who hold significant responsibility for tilling the land and feeding their families. Tree planting, a core strategy for the Green Belt Movement, addressed some of the initial basic needs identified by women. Tree planting is also simple, attainable and guarantees successful results within a reasonable amount time. This sustains interest and commitment.</p><p>Equally significantly, Prof. Maathai helped show to Africa and the world that patriarchal systems push this responsibility on women, and that this role is devalued and invisible despite it being so fundamental. It is necessary to value this important work of women, and to value that today women hold the answers to many new challenges. An important contribution is to make Africa and the South in general rethink ways of development by taking into account the knowledge and practices of women.</p><p>An example of this approach working in practice is the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ecoindia.com/education/chipko-movement.html">Chipko movement in India</a>, which succeeded due to the commitment and involvement of rural women. These women were being impacted by decisions to fell trees in the forest where they made their livelihoods, and became instrumental in the campaign to save the trees. Another exemplary movement is the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.navdanya.org/diverse-women-for-diversity">Diverse Women for Diversity</a>, an international movement started in the mid–90s with RFSTE/Navdanya that defends diversity, peace and democracy from the growing threats of monoculture, war, totalitarianism and fundamentalism.</p><p><a href="http://actionaid.org.br">ActionAid Brazil</a>&nbsp;has also supported rural women to come together to recognise their knowledge on agroecology, and show to environmentalists and society why&nbsp;<strong>without feminism we will not have agroecology</strong>. In the book&nbsp;<em>Women and Agroecology</em>&nbsp;(2010), researched and written by ActionAid, the Working Group of the Women’s National Agroecology Coalition, and our local partners in Brazil, we presented several oppressive situations of men over women related to the management of agro-ecosystems. Different groups of peasant women contributed and structured their own experiences in agroecology to this research.</p><p>These experiences were varied but shared some disturbingly common narratives, for example:&nbsp;</p><ul><li>situations where men prevent women from developing their agro-ecological experiences, either by contaminating their crops or prevent them from accessing credit;</li><li>cases where women have no right to choose for diversification of crops rather than monocultures;</li><li>circumstances where their crops are removed and/or burnt to open space for other cultures that men consider most profitable, such as grass;</li><li>situations where women cannot choose to not use poisons and chemical fertilizers;</li><li>cases where the woman, even when they are “responsible” for water management, cannot make decisions on water use, or cannot use water to irrigate their medicinal and/or ornamental plants.</li></ul><p>The book points out that these cases, although they are different from physical violence, are cases of violence that also leave marks:</p><blockquote><p>There is the view that women in agroecology would be immune to situations of oppression, due to its principles that value a more harmonious coexistence with nature and humans. But it appears that the living spaces do not fully reflect these principles of harmony, bringing to these spaces the same challenges that are present in the society as a whole. Given the inconsistency between violence and agroecological principles, the various forms of violence against women must be considered unacceptable in agroecology. It is impossible to strengthen agroecology and the struggle for sustainability, without thinking of new relations between men and women, based on equality, solidarity, appreciation of the work, the appreciation of the life and the integrity of women.</p></blockquote><p>-&nbsp;<em>Women and Agroecology</em>, 2010</p><p>The experiences presented indicate that, when they started working on an agroecological perspective, women frequently face the kinds of challenges listed above. However many have been able to change the productive matrix through their empowerment as political subjects and through self-organization. In this way they not only modify common agro-ecological management relationships but also increase the diversity of their disciplines and communities.</p><p>This approach has enabled these women to achieve some autonomy, and to open up the possibility to speak and be heard on issues where they never had the opportunity to decide - such as which species to plant. Encouraged by agroecological innovations and by the positive results of their experiments, these women have been recognised for their work and their knowledge by their relatives and neighbours. Their self-confidence had also been strengthened. In some cases their ongoing struggles, such as participation in women’s and/or black movements, helped to facilitate their identification with agroecology and further strengthened themselves, contributing to their processes of empowerment.</p><h2>Criticism of ecofeminism</h2><p>Ecofeminism has had its fair share of criticisms: of maintaining the gender binary of male/female, and of often confining women to their traditional caring role. It is perhaps fair to say that there are lines of ecofeminism that are essentialist and constructivist. Ecologists have also criticised some forms of feminism that do not critique the economic model that leads to environmental degradation.</p><h2>Conclusion</h2><p>ActionAid is looking at a situation where we can draw upon principles of both ecology and feminism to find some solutions to the myriad of challenges we are facing in today’s world. We do not believe in binaries, as we do not support reducing women’s lives to their care roles or to be in servitude.&nbsp;<strong>We believe that the knowledge and practices of nature management exercised by women in Latin America, Africa, Asia, etc. can point to other possible developments and to challenge patriarchal practices.</strong></p><p>We believe it’s crucial today more than ever before to look at strategies that help advance women’s rights – including economic and social, without undermining our ecology - and at the same time looking at sustainable ecological solutions that do not reinforce patriarchal systems. We hope this blog will encourage conversations to help identify key principles and practices that can be part of our sustainable future.</p><p><img src="http://www.peuples-solidaires.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_content_fullwidth/image/img_8742_0.jpg" alt="File 37911" title="" width="555" height="833" class="ibimage null"/></p><p><em>Photo: Felipe Kusnitzki/ActionAid Brazil</em></p> </div> http://www.actionaid.org/2017/07/what-can-we-learn-ecofeminism#comments Food & land rights Womens Rights International Fri, 28 Jul 2017 09:21:42 +0000 ruchi.tripathi 704934 at http://www.actionaid.org Charter of Demands: Actualizing women's land rights in Africa http://www.actionaid.org/publications/charter-demands-actualizing-womens-land-rights-africa <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/charter-demands-actualizing-womens-land-rights-africa" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/english_charter_to_print_final.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="331" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> Women to Kilimanjaro, ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/english_charter_to_print_final.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>english_charter_to_print_final.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-03-29T00:00:00+01:00">Wednesday, March 29, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>The Kilimanjaro Initiative is a rural women’s mobilisation from across Africa towards an iconic moment at the foot of Mt Kilimanjaro in October 2016. The Kilimanjaro Initiative was conceived when, we the Rural Women of Africa with support from civil society, met in Dar es Salaam in 2012. This initiative aims to create space for us to be able to participate in decision making processes about land and natural resources.</p><p>With 2016 declared by the 26th African Union Summit as “Africa Year of Human Rights with particular focus on the Rights of Women”, coupled with the transition from MDGs into SDGs, our quest for actualization of our right to land and natural resources towards a food and nutritional secure continent could have never been timelier.</p><p>Also noting that in October 2015, the AU Special Technical Committee on agriculture, water and environ- ment recommended that Member States allocate at least 30% of land to women; improve land rights of women through legislative/other mechanisms, in order to give prac- tical effect to the AU declaration on Land in which all African states committed to ensure equitable access to land for all land users and strengthen women’s land rights. The women have therefore pro- claimed this Charter of principles and demands specifically on women’s access to use, control, own, inherit and dispose their land and natural resources.</p><p>Download the Charter in:</p><ul><li><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/english_charter_to_print_final.pdf">English</a></li><li><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/french_charter_to_print_final.pdf">French</a></li><li><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/portuguese_charter_to_print_final.pdf">Portuguese</a></li><li><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/swahili_charter_to_print.pdf">Swahili</a></li></ul> </div> Africa Food & land rights International Wed, 29 Mar 2017 12:30:00 +0000 Rob Safar 696618 at http://www.actionaid.org Civil Society Statement on the Reform of European Agricultural Policies - Good Food, Good Farming – Now! http://www.actionaid.org/2017/03/civil-society-statement-reform-european-agricultural-policies-good-food-good-farming-now <div class="field field-image-nid"> <div class="buildmode-embedded_image"> <div class="node node-type-image clear-block"> <div class="nd-region-middle-wrapper nd-no-sidebars" ><div class="nd-region-middle"><div class="field field-image-file"> <a href="/2017/03/civil-society-statement-reform-european-agricultural-policies-good-food-good-farming-now" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large imagecache-linked imagecache-thumb_large_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/thumb_large/image/img_20160310_153431.jpg" alt="Civil society workshop on sustainable food and farming, Brussels, 2016" title="Civil society workshop on sustainable food and farming, Brussels, 2016" width="140" height="140" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large"/></a> </div> </div></div> </div> <!-- /node --> </div> <!-- /buildmode --> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <div>We, the undersigned organisations, believe that the European food and farming system is broken: that it is working for the interests of a few to the detriment of the majority of people, farmers, and the planet.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>Europe’s food and farming system directly contributes to a wasteful use of finite global resources and damages the environment by contributing to climate change, biodiversity loss, depletion of fisheries, deforestation, soil erosion, water scarcity, as well as water and air pollution. Factory-style farming – largely dependent on imports and a major contributor to antimicrobial resistance – has been promoted at the expense of viable incomes for farmers and jobs in rural areas in Europe, as well as human rights, decent work, and livelihoods in developing countries. Farmers are facing a flawed choice between bankruptcy and further intensification. Farmers practising credible alternatives like organic and agro-ecological agriculture remain on the fringes in favour of business as usual. At the same time, high levels of undernourishment, the rapid rise in obesity and unhealthy diets are among the main causes of death and disease both in Europe and worldwide.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>The EU’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) has contributed to this broken food and farming system through the promotion of agro-industrial farming methods and global commodity chains. In order to meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and its obligations under the Paris Climate Agreement, the EU must carry out a radical reform of the CAP and related policies. A fairer, more sustainable and resilient system is urgently needed.&nbsp;</div><div>The undersigned organisations call for a major transformation of Europe’s food and farming system on the basis of the following principles:</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>- <strong>Fair and diverse food and farming economies</strong>: ensure a fair income and decent work conditions for farmers and farm workers; facilitate access to farmland for sustainable peasant farming; encourage short supply chains and sustainable public procurement policies; grant fair access to high quality products for all consumers; prevent negative impacts on people’s right to food and on the livelihoods of smallholder farmers in the global south.</div><div><strong>- Healthy environment and a food and farming system that respects animal welfare</strong>: ensure the end of harmful subsidies; reward and incentivise the delivery of positive environmental and social outcomes; restore and prevent further loss of biodiversity; encourage conservation and active use of genetic diversity; ensure agricultural production is free from synthetic chemical pesticides and mineral fertilisers that harm the environment; prevent and minimise food waste throughout the food chain; halt food and feed imports linked to deforestation; ensure that animal health and welfare are effectively respected; replace the current industrial livestock system with extensive alternatives where animals are not treated as mere commodities and the balance between livestock and land capacity is ensured, while the overuse of antibiotics prevented; radically reduce emissions from farming and ensure a transition towards a resilient food and farming system.</div><div>-<strong> Support for citizens’ health and well-being</strong>: ensure our food and farming system fosters healthy, nutritious, seasonal, local, culturally appropriate and affordable diets; encourage lower levels of animal product consumption; raise citizens’ awareness of the impacts of consumption on their own health, on farmers, animals and the environment; prevent negative impacts of agricultural methods on the health of farmers, farm workers and rural populations.</div><div>- <strong>A publicly accountable food system with participatory governance, citizens’ empowerment and democracy</strong>: involve citizens in transparent decision making processes; prevent corporate capture of decision making; empower local communities to lead the transformation.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div>We are committed to achieving a real transition by working in partnership with farmers, citizens and policy-makers. Therefore, we urge the European institutions and national policymakers to rethink the role and direction of European agriculture policies and use the principles presented above as a basis for the post-2020 Common Agricultural Policy reform process.</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><div><strong>List of organisations supporting the statement/ March 2017</strong></div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>EU and International organisations</strong></div><div>ACT Alliance EU</div><div>ActionAid</div><div>Agricultural and Rural Convention</div><div>Arche Noah</div><div>Bee Life European Beekeeping Coordination</div><div>BirdLife Europe</div><div>CEEweb for Biodiversity</div><div>ClientEarth</div><div>Climate Action Network Europe</div><div>Compassion in World Farming</div><div>Corporate Europe Observatory</div><div>Euro Coop</div><div>Eurogroup for Animals</div><div>European Coordination Via Campesina</div><div>European Environmental Bureau</div><div>European Public Health Alliance</div><div>Fair Trade Advocacy Office</div><div>Fern</div><div>FOUR PAWS / VIER PFOTEN</div><div>Friends of the Earth Europe</div><div>Greenpeace</div><div>Humane Society International/Europe</div><div>IFOAM EU – International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements EU</div><div>Pesticide Action Network Europe</div><div>Slow Food</div><div>Urgenci</div><div>WWF</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Austria</strong></div><div>DKA Austria Hilfswerk der Katholischen Jungschar</div><div>Grüne Bäuerinnen und Bauern Österreich</div><div>Slow Food Pinzgau</div><div>Slow Food Vorarlberg</div><div>Umweltdachverband</div><div>Welthaus Diözese Graz-Seckau</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Belgium</strong></div><div>BioForum Vlaanderen</div><div>Carbon Market Watch</div><div>Natuurpunt</div><div>Oxfam-Solidarity</div><div>Slow Food Metropolitan Brussels</div><div>Voedsel Anders</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Bulgaria</strong></div><div>Association of Slow Food in Bulgaria</div><div>BIOSELENA Foundation for organic agriculture</div><div>BSPB/BirdLife Bulgaria</div><div>Bulgarian Organic Products Association</div><div>Europe and We</div><div>Za Zemiata - Friends of the Earth Bulgaria</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Croatia</strong></div><div>Association Kinookus</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Czech Republic</strong></div><div>Czech Society for Ornithology/Birdlife Czech Republic</div><div>Slow Food Palava</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Denmark</strong></div><div>DOF / BirdLife Denmark</div><div>NOAH Friends of the Earth Denmark</div><div>Økologisk Landsforening / Organic Denmark</div><div>The Danish Society for Nature Conservation</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Finland</strong></div><div>Finnish Association for Organic Farming – Luomuliitto</div><div>The Finnish NGDO Platform to the EU Kehys</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>France</strong></div><div>Compassion In World Farming France</div><div>Ecologie Développement Durable Démocratie</div><div>Fédération Nationale d’Agriculture Biologique</div><div>Fondation Nicolas Hulot Pour La Nature Et L’Homme</div><div>Générations Futures</div><div>la ferme Bio de l’Estuaire</div><div>Le Ruban Vert</div><div>LPO France (BirdLife France)</div><div>Mouvement d’Agriculture Biodynamique</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Germany</strong></div><div>Bioland</div><div>BUND - Friends of the Earth Germany</div><div>Demeter e.V.</div><div>Deutscher Naturschutzring</div><div>Die Freien Bäcker e.V.</div><div>ECOVIN Bundesverband Ökologischer Weinbau Wormser</div><div>Institut für Welternährung- World Food Institute eV. Berlin</div><div>NABU Naturschutzbund Deutschland e.V.</div><div>Naturland</div><div>Slow Food Deutschland e. V.</div><div>Slow Food Youth Deutschland</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Greece</strong></div><div>ANTIGONE - Information and Documentation Center on Racism, Ecology, Peace and Non Violence</div><div>Argos Animal Welfare Thessaloniki</div><div>Ecological Movement of Thessaloniki</div><div>Eptapsyhes-Nine Lives</div><div>Hellenic Ornithological Society/BirdLife Greece</div><div>NatureFriends Greece</div><div>No Border Workshop</div><div>PROSKALO</div><div>Single Ecological Metamorphosis and Mesogeion</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Hungary</strong></div><div>Magyar Biokultúra Szövetség</div><div>MME/BirdLife Hungary</div><div>Slow Food Heves-Mátra</div><div>Slow Food Nagykoru</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Ireland</strong></div><div>BirdWatch Ireland</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Italy</strong></div><div>Aam Terra Nuova</div><div>Compassion in World Farming Italy</div><div>Consorzio della Quarantina</div><div>DEAFAL ONG - Delegazione Europea per l’Agricoltura in Asia, Africa e America Latina</div><div>Federazione Pro Natura</div><div>FederBio - Italian Federation of Organic And Biodynamic Agriculture</div><div>Legambiente Onlus</div><div>Lipu - BirdLife Italy</div><div>Pesticide Action Network (PAN) Italy</div><div>Slow Food Italia</div><div>Soleterre ONLUS</div><div>Unaapi- Unione Nazionale Associazioni Apicoltori Italiani</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Latvia</strong></div><div>Latvian Fund for nature</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Luxembourg</strong></div><div>Action Solidarité Tiers Monde ASTM</div><div>Attac Luxembourg</div><div>Bio-Lëtzebuerg - Vereenegung fir Biolandwirtschaft Lëtzebuerg asbl</div><div>Caritas Luxembourg</div><div>Catholic Church in Luxembourg</div><div>Centre for Ecological Learning Luxembourg</div><div>etika Initiativ fir Alternativ Finanzéierung</div><div>Frères des Hommes</div><div>Initiativ Liewensufank asbl</div><div>Mouvement Ecologique</div><div>natur&amp;ëmwelt a.s.b.l.</div><div>SOS FAIM</div><div>TERRA - Transition and Education for a Resilient and Regenerative Agriculture</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Malta</strong></div><div>Breeds of Origin Conservancy</div><div>Last Friday of the Month Gourmet</div><div>Slow Food Malta</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Netherlands</strong></div><div>Compassion in World Farming Nederland</div><div>Museum Geelvinck</div><div>Natuurmonumenten</div><div>Slow Food Nederland</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Poland</strong></div><div>Compassion in World Farming Poland</div><div>Slow Food Warsaw</div><div>Slow Food Youth Wrocław</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Portugal</strong></div><div>LPN - Liga para a Protecção da Natureza</div><div>SPEA - Sociedade Portuguesa para o Estudo das Aves</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Romania</strong></div><div>Asociația Mai bine</div><div>Fundatia ADEPT Transilvania</div><div>Slow Food Bucuresti Valahia Gusturilor</div><div>Slow Food Tara Silvania, Salaj, Romania</div><div>Slow Food Tarnava Mare</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Slovakia</strong></div><div>Agro-Eko forum</div><div>CEPTA - Centre for Sustainable Alternatives</div><div>Ekotrend Slovakia</div><div>Permakultúra SK</div><div>Raptor Protection of Slovakia</div><div>Slow Food Pressburg</div><div>Slow Food Youth Slovakia</div><div>SOS/BirdLife Slovakia</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Slovenia</strong></div><div>DOPPS-BirdLife Slovenia</div><div>Inštitut za trajnostni razvoj - Institute for Sustainable Development</div><div>Movement for Sustainable Development of Slovenia – TRS</div><div>NEC Notranjska ecological centre, Cerknica</div><div>Society for conservation, research and sustainable development of the Dinaric ecosystems – Dinaricum</div><div>Umanotera, The Slovenian Foundation for Sustainable Development</div><div>Zavod Svibna</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Spain</strong></div><div>Asociación Valor Ecológico, CAAE (ECOVALIA)</div><div>SEO/BirdLife</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>Sweden</strong></div><div>Swedish Society for Nature Conservation</div><div>&nbsp;</div><div><strong>United Kingdom</strong></div><div>Friends of the Earth ENWI</div><div>Slow Food England</div><div>Slow Food in the UK</div><div>Soil Association</div><div>Sustain: the alliance for better food and farming</div></div> </div> http://www.actionaid.org/2017/03/civil-society-statement-reform-european-agricultural-policies-good-food-good-farming-now#comments Europe CAP Food & land rights International Mon, 13 Mar 2017 09:40:46 +0000 693450 at http://www.actionaid.org