Womens Rights http://www.actionaid.org/tags/429/10 en Policy Brief: Incorporation of Women’s Economic Empowerment and Unpaid Care Work into regional polices: South Asia http://www.actionaid.org/publications/policy-brief-incorporation-womens-economic-empowerment-and-unpaid-care-work-regional-0 <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/policy-brief-incorporation-womens-economic-empowerment-and-unpaid-care-work-regional-0" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/policy_brief_weeucw_sasia_online_version.png" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/policy_brief_weeucw_sasia_online_version.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>policy_brief_weeucw_sasia_online_version.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-07-31T00:00:00+01:00">Monday, July 31, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <h3>A case for centring Unpaid Care Work within regional frameworks</h3><p>&nbsp;</p><p>The promotion of women’s economic empowerment is an issue that is being increasingly focused on by different actors and policies across South Asia. However, the gendered nature and unequal burden of Unpaid Care Work is a key challenge to this, particularly for women in rural areas.</p><p>In response to this challenge, a policy briefing has been developed as part of ActionAid’s five-year multi-country POWER project. This is the second in a planned series of policy and research papers. It provides an analysis of the current policies and practices across South Asia that relate to rural women’s economic empowerment, especially the inclusion of the issue of Unpaid Care Work. There is a particular focus on the countries of Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Pakistan. It considers the successes and the gaps, and identi es opportunities for improvement. It also seeks to link Unpaid Care Work and women’s economic empowerment with the issue of Violence Against Women.</p> </div> unpaid care work Womens Rights International Thu, 18 Jan 2018 12:40:41 +0000 Rob Safar 713804 at http://www.actionaid.org Policy Brief: Incorporation of Women’s Economic Empowerment and Unpaid Care Work into regional polices: Africa http://www.actionaid.org/publications/policy-brief-incorporation-womens-economic-empowerment-and-unpaid-care-work-regional <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/policy-brief-incorporation-womens-economic-empowerment-and-unpaid-care-work-regional" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/policy_brief_weeucw_africa_online_version.png" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/policy_brief_weeucw_africa_online_version.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>policy_brief_weeucw_africa_online_version.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-07-31T00:00:00+01:00">Monday, July 31, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <h3>Time to start caring – how ignoring Unpaid Care Work is holding back economic empowerment of Africa’s rural women</h3><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Agriculture accounts on average for one third of Africa’s GDP and women make up as much as half of its rural workforce. Given the various commitments made on gender equality, economic development and agricultural policies, African agriculture should be a success story for rural women but this is far from the case. The most obvious challenge is the staggering unequal burden of Unpaid Care Work.</p><p>In response to these challenges this policy briefing was developed as part of ActionAid’s five year multi country POWER project. This is the first in a planned series of policy and research papers. It provides an analysis of the current policies, and practices, across Africa that relate to rural women’s economic empowerment and, in particular, the inclusion of the issue of Unpaid Care Work. It considers the successes and the gaps, and identifies opportunities for improvement. It also seeks to link Unpaid Care Work and women’s economic empowerment with the issue of Violence Against Women.</p> </div> Africa unpaid care work Womens Rights International Thu, 18 Jan 2018 12:37:59 +0000 Rob Safar 713803 at http://www.actionaid.org No Place To Go: How unregulated investments are worsening land, gender and food security inequalities in South East Asia http://www.actionaid.org/publications/no-place-go-how-unregulated-investments-are-worsening-land-gender-and-food-security <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/no-place-go-how-unregulated-investments-are-worsening-land-gender-and-food-security" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/policy_brief_layout_hires_11_27_17_final.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="332" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid, AsiaDHRRA, Oxfam </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/policy_brief_layout_hires_11_27_17_final.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>policy_brief_layout_hires_11_27_17_final.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-12-06T00:00:00+00:00">Wednesday, December 6, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>Leaders from Southeast Asia are meeting in Manila in November 2017 to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). ASEAN leaders will have the chance to reflect on the region's economic development plan - central to the creation of the ASEAN Economic Community - and consider its impact on peoples across the region. They have an opportunity to redefine the idea of regional economic cooperation as less about trade, investment, and liberalization, and more about creating a regional economy where women enjoy the same economic rights&nbsp; and opportunities as men, where everyone-not only the rich-gains from economic progress, and where economic growth is not achieved at the expense of the environment.</p><p>Like many regional blocs, ASEAN aspires to be an economic powerhouse by becoming a vital link in the glob al supply chain. In line with this, ASEAN began implementing a host of policies as early as the 1990s to facilitate trade and to attract foreign direct investments (FDI) into the region, with some success. ASEAN trade with the world rose from USD 1.61 trillion in 2007 to USD 2.53 trillion in 2014.1 FDI flows to the region increased from USD 10 8.1 billion in 2010 to USD 1 29.9 billion in 2014.</p><p>Although these high rates have since dropped, what remains is the impact of this economic model on women and marginalised groups living in the region. Unregulated private sector investment affects women, peoples' access and right to land, and the climate and the environment. Without safeguards, private sector&nbsp; investments tend to perpetuate&nbsp; gender&nbsp; wage gaps and lead to &nbsp;disinvestment&nbsp; in public services, which increases women's unpaid care work burden . This, in turn, limits women's life choices and exacerbates gender inequality.&nbsp; Unregulated investments chip away at communities' access to land, and the drive for increased economic output uses up natural resources.&nbsp; Investment s affect segments of society differently; it is marginalised groups living in precarious&nbsp; contexts that are the&nbsp; worst affected. Inequality is no longer just about disparities in income and wealth. It also pertains to the very lack of economic opportunities and the inability of marginalised people to influence and participate in decisions affecting them.</p><p>This policy brief summarises the impact of the ASEAN's economic model on gender inequality, land rights, and climate; and offers recommendations for ASEAN to help it eradicate poverty and inequality, in keeping with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and with other human rights agreements.</p> </div> Asia Food & land rights Womens Rights International Wed, 06 Dec 2017 13:57:10 +0000 Rob Safar 713169 at http://www.actionaid.org Whose City? An evaluation of urban safety for women in 10 countries http://www.actionaid.org/publications/whose-city-evaluation-urban-safety-women-10-countries <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/whose-city-evaluation-urban-safety-women-10-countries" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/whose_city_web.png" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/201182.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>201182.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-11-30T00:00:00+00:00">Thursday, November 30, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>The New Urban Agenda agreed at the United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (also called Habitat III) in Quito, October 2016, guides nation states, city and regional authorities and others in their thinking about cities, urbanisation and sustainable development. It commits to making real the concept of ‘cities for all’ (ofen referred to as the ‘right to the city’), bringing together a set of already internationally recognised rights to ensure that inhabitants enjoy a just and sustainable city, which is essential for a high quality of life. Women’s participation is essential for building cities that are enjoyed fairly and equally by all who live in and access them. It is fundamental that their voices are heard and their experiences considered when shaping the city.</p><p>ActionAid and its partners have been working to safeguard women’s right to the city for many years, primarily through the Safe Cities for Women campaign, to address violence against women in urban public spaces. It is widely acknowledged that, overall, governments across the world still fail to prioritise women’s rights by continuing to pursue a neoliberal model of development which, among other things, suppresses regulation and the equal distribution of wealth; promotes the privatisation of public services and exploitation of women’s paid and unpaid labour; and ultimately entrenches gender inequality. Urban planning is ofen gender-blind, failing to recognise or respond to the diferent ways in which women and men experience urban spaces and their differing practical and long-term needs.</p><p>This report presents the results of an evaluation of women’s safety in urban spaces in a broad selection of countries in which ActionAid works: Bangladesh, Brazil, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Jordan, Liberia, Nepal, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa and Zimbabwe. A scorecard method is used to score countries based on the overall rate of physical and sexual violence women face in their lifetimes; the existence of national legal frameworks and resourced plans of action to address gender-based violence; and whether or not there is a gender analysis and perspective applied in urban planning – particularly in the design and planning of public transport. This scorecard does not claim to be a fully comprehensive analysis of all factors impacting on women’s safety in cities. For example, rather than look at all public services available, it focuses on public transport. However, it provides a first glimpse of the challenges, and touches on some key issues, particularly governments’ capacity to address women’s safety.</p><p>The report aims to help governments better understand where they may be falling short, and to identify and prioritise actions to improve urban safety. It shows that women still do not fully enjoy their right to the city despite government commitments to end gender- based violence using various rights instruments, national legislation, policy frameworks, or the setting up of national central policy-making and coordination structures for mainstreaming gender equality. Across the board, women overwhelmingly still face and are constantly under the threat of violence, harassment and intimidation. In Nepal, nine in 10 women interviewed face sexual harassment in public places and the younger they are the more they are at risk.</p><p>In Brazil, a woman is raped every 11 minutes and the situation is deteriorating as the country experiences a rapid roll-back on its women’s rights commitments. In Senegal, deep-rooted patriarchal beliefs continue to influence legal and policy frameworks such that women’s rights go unprotected. In Jordan, there has been a major debate recently about amendments to the penal code that sought to maintain immunity from prosecution for rapists if they marry their victims aged between 15 and 18 years.</p><p>Advocating for state authorities to be accountable for the delivery of accessible, afordable, quality gender- responsive public services has been at the heart of the Safe Cities for Women work. Women’s safety and enjoyment of their right to the city depend on proper road and lighting infrastructure; public transport; water and sanitation, including public toilets; policing; crime prevention; and violence-response services such as shelters, rape crisis centres and legal aid. States violate human rights principles and entrench gender inequality (including violence against women) when they fail to deliver universal public services. This evaluation focuses on public transport – recognising that safe public transport systems are a necessary prerequisite for women and girls to be able to exercise their right to freedom of movement and enjoy and use their cities’ services without the threat of exclusion, sexual violence or harassment. Yet inappropriate design, unafordability, inaccessibility and lack of safety continue to characterise public transport in many cities.</p><p>Although we highlight some successful and innovative ways in which women’s rights, social justice movements and civil society organisations influence and work with governments to improve women’s urban safety, these best-practice cases are exceptions rather than the rule. Progress is held back by a lack of sustained implementation and resources.</p> </div> Womens Rights International Thu, 30 Nov 2017 00:00:00 +0000 Rob Safar 713016 at http://www.actionaid.org Responsible governance of tenure must be gender sensitive http://www.actionaid.org/2017/11/responsible-governance-tenure-must-be-gender-sensitive <div class="field field-image-nid"> <div class="buildmode-embedded_image"> <div class="node node-type-image clear-block"> <div class="nd-region-middle-wrapper nd-no-sidebars" ><div class="nd-region-middle"><div class="field field-image-file"> <a href="/2017/11/responsible-governance-tenure-must-be-gender-sensitive" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large imagecache-linked imagecache-thumb_large_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/thumb_large/image/190936.jpg" alt="" title="" width="140" height="140" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large"/></a> </div> </div></div> </div> <!-- /node --> </div> <!-- /buildmode --> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <p>The livelihoods of hundreds of millions of people, particularly the rural poor, are heavily dependent on secure and equitable access to and control over land and natural resources which are in turn the source of food and shelter, the basis for social, cultural and religious practices, and a central factor in economic growth.</p><p>While each country’s unique tenure system and challenges require tailored responses, there is a need common across most countries, for substantial investments in land governance, management and administration, as well as more focused work to address those sections of society whose tenure rights are the weakest. This particularly applies to marginalized communities- women, small-scale food producers and indigenous groups.</p><p>The Voluntary Guidelines on the responsible Governance of Tenure of land, forest and fisheries- VGGTs, together with the AU Framework and Guidelines for land policy in Africa- AU F&amp;G, both provide progressive internationally accepted principles and norms for defining policies and practice for governance of tenure that particularly safeguard the interests of the poor and marginalized land dependent sections of society.&nbsp; To give effect to these guidelines, ActionAid developed <em>a </em><em>Toolkit for assessing gender-sensitive implementation of the VGGTs and the AU F&amp;G at country-level</em>. The toolkit was piloted in four countries- Senegal, the Gambia, Netherlands and Australia, with key lessons emerging and captured in this report.</p><p>At ActionAid, we believe that strategies aimed at achieving the following principle are key to achieving the right governance of tenure that can be termed as responsible</p><h3>1: Inclusive multi-stakeholder platforms</h3><p>Multi-stakeholder platforms are encouraged in the VGGTs as the recommended approach to the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the Guidelines, in order to ensure participation, collaboration, transparency and accountability in these efforts. Multi-stakeholder platforms may be established at multiple levels and should be gender-sensitive and particularly involve representatives of marginalized and vulnerable groups. The AU F&amp;G recommends participatory process in the “design of land policy&nbsp; formulation and implementation strategies” <strong></strong></p><h3>2: Recognition of customary rights and informal tenure</h3><p>One of the principal tenets of the VGGTs is the recognition of all existing legitimate forms of tenure, both formal and informal, very key for indigenous peoples and marginalized&nbsp; communities. The VGGTs call on states to provide <em>appropriate recognition and protection of the legitimate tenure rights of indigenous peoples and other communities with customary tenure systems</em> and to adapt their policy, legal, and organizational frameworks to recognize such tenure systems. Similarly, the AU F&amp;G advocates for the recognition of the “legitimacy of indigenous land rights’’ and calls for consultation and participation in policy processes, by those who have legitimate tenure rights that could be affected by policy decisions.&nbsp;</p><h3>3: Gender Equality</h3><p>The VGGTs include Gender Equality as one of the principles essential to responsible governance of tenure, and calls on States to ensure that women and girls have equal tenure rights independent of their civil and marital status. The AU F&amp;G recognizes that “gender discrimination” is pervasive in Africa and that there is need for women’s land rights to be strengthened, regardless of their marital status.</p><h3>4: Protection from land grabs</h3><p>The VGGTs offer several recommendations on measures that States can take to prevent loss of legitimate tenure rights resulting from large-scale land acquisitions, as per the human rights principles. <em>State should provide safeguards to protect legitimate tenure rights, human rights, livelihoods, food security and the environment </em>from risks associated with large-scale land acquisitions. Similarly, the AU F&amp;G note that enhanced agricultural exports could lead to increased state revenue, implying a bias towards large-scale commercial agriculture. As a safeguard, the Guiding Principles for Large Scale Land Acquisition also adopted by the AU&nbsp; stress the need for all land-based investment decisions to respect human rights, including customary rights and the rights of women.</p><h3>5: Effective Land Administration</h3><p>A continuing challenge in many countries is the absence of effective institutions, land registries and community action for land management. The VGGTs provide multiple recommendations about land administration to increase land tenure security of small-scale food producers. <em>“States should provide systems… to record individual and collective tenure rights in order to improve security of tenure rights.” </em>For effective land administration, both the VGGTs and the F&amp;G advocate for policy implementing agencies to ensure that policies and laws are effective and gender sensitive manner.</p><h3>6: Conflict resolution mechanisms</h3><p>Independent, reliable and effective conflict resolution mechanisms are key to ensuring justice and land tenure security of the poor, particularly women. The VGGTs promote the development of appropriate and effective alternative forms of dispute resolution, while the F&amp;G advocates for the “prevention of conflict” and “resolution through mutually acceptable dispute processing mechanisms” and strengthening conflict resolution methods.</p><p>We now have an excellent toolkit to help CSOs and communities assess how these key principles are being implemented at country and local levels. In this toolkit are 3 interrelated, yet independent tools focusing on:</p><ul><li><strong>Tool 1</strong> looks at records the policy and legal framework currently in place.&nbsp;</li><li><strong>Tool 2</strong> to assess how the legal and regulatory frameworks are operational and implemented at the local level; and</li><li><strong>Tool 3</strong> Assesses implementation of the VGGTs in foreign policy and donor relations for OECD countries</li></ul><p>In piloting these tools, some interesting lessons emerged from Senegal, the Gambia, Netherlands and Australia. It emerged that prior training is really useful in helping the communities do the analysis and have an understanding of their rights to participate in land governance. The assessment<strong> </strong>provided communities with an opportunity to learn on the use of the tool at the same help them to understand tenure systems and how it affects them. For this, translation of the guidelines and the tools in languages appropriate for communities is key.</p><p>Similarly, the systems and institutions in place had problems implementing the two guidelines and the training and analysis helps these institutions to understand their duties (based on commitments they have made internationally towards these guidelines). &nbsp;The Gambia Government for example recognized the challenges inherent in the traditional land tenure regimes, which does not give space for women to fully participate in decision making regarding land administration.&nbsp; However, the tool provides great potential for women to engage government to demand for their rights.</p><p>Sharing findings with CSO appreciated as the tools can be used to enhance the relationship with the state and the communities in order to improve land governance. &nbsp;</p><p>The policy level assessment helps to make concrete recommendations on what these policies should contain. As such, It was useful to engage with the government to clarify issues related to such policies, and respond to concerns for example why we are very particular about customary tenure as well as gender</p><p>The nexus between international trade and land rights also emerged . Trade has a potential effect on land laws, particularly where there are Investment State Dispute Settlement provisions in trade agreements.&nbsp; Similarly, extractive activities have potential to lead to loss of tenure rights for women and communities,although, both guidelines do not cover the governance of mines and mineral.</p><p>It was also clear that we have to address the close link between land and natural resource rights (the complexity of it all).</p><p><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/publications/VGGT-toolkit-2017">Find the toolkit here</a>, and <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/publications/VGGT-report-2017">the assessment report here.</a></p> </div> http://www.actionaid.org/2017/11/responsible-governance-tenure-must-be-gender-sensitive#comments Food & land rights Governance Womens Rights International Thu, 16 Nov 2017 22:00:00 +0000 catherine.gatundu 711688 at http://www.actionaid.org Women as “underutilized assets” http://www.actionaid.org/2017/10/women-underutilized-assets <div class="field field-image-nid"> <div class="buildmode-embedded_image"> <div class="node node-type-image clear-block"> <div class="nd-region-middle-wrapper nd-no-sidebars" ><div class="nd-region-middle"><div class="field field-image-file"> <a href="/2017/10/women-underutilized-assets" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large imagecache-linked imagecache-thumb_large_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/thumb_large/image/118273scr.jpg" alt="" title="" width="140" height="140" class="imagecache imagecache-thumb_large"/></a> </div> </div></div> </div> <!-- /node --> </div> <!-- /buildmode --> </div> <div class="field field-body"> <h3 class="code-line" data-line="0">A critical review of IMF advice on female labour force participation and fiscal consolidation</h3><p class="code-line" data-line="4"><strong>By virtually every global measure, women are disadvantaged relative to men.</strong>&nbsp;Access to decent work is no exception. Women are overrepresented in the least paid, most insecure and vulnerable jobs, and have less opportunity and access to resources to start and develop their own businesses than men.</p><p class="code-line" data-line="6">Deeply-embedded patriarchal norms mean that women have a dual role in the economy: productive and reproductive. This reality – and the failure of governments, businesses and institutions to recognise and address it – mean that women’s unpaid labour is too often exploited or unrecognised, even as it provides a massive subsidy to states and economies.</p><p class="code-line" data-line="8">This double burden on women has negative health and well-being impacts. This also gives rise to the phenomenon of&nbsp;<em>time poverty</em>&nbsp;and impacts on the type of paid work women can engage in. When paid and unpaid work hours are counted, women work longer days than men in nearly all countries. Analysis and advice on getting more women into the workforce needs to address these structural injustices.</p><p class="code-line" data-line="10">Recent IMF surveillance reports contain country-specific advice on increasing women's participation in the labour force. In these, the economic argument for enabling more women to join the workforce is strongly made, though no clear recognition of women’s current levels of unpaid care and domestic work is present in many of the reports. The view of women as currently "underutilised" is both implicitly and explicitly stated. This is a dangerous analytical starting point.</p><p class="code-line" data-line="12">The most important and complementary role that the IMF can take in support for women’s rights and gender equality is likely to be supporting its member countries in identifying progressive ways to create the fiscal space needed for crucial reforms.</p><p class="code-line" data-line="14">Some of the recent IMF surveillance reports recognises the need for investments in the care economy in the female labour force participation advice. However, a large majority of the countries that were advised to increase female labour force participation were also told to start, increase or not deviate from plans on fiscal consolidation, without addressing the gendered impacts of this advice.</p><p class="code-line" data-line="16">Fiscal policy advice will impact on the realisation of gender equality and women’s economic and social rights, including and beyond their access to decent work. More fundamentally, if the IMF wants to address gender inequality, it needs to first examine the impact of previous and current IMF policies on women’s productive and reproductive work.</p><p class="code-line" data-line="18">Mainstream macroeconomic policy has greater gendered impacts than any separate advice can compensate for. In line with work by Global Unions and the Bretton Woods Project, ActionAid calls on the IMF to ensure that every aspect of its country surveillance, alongside its lending and technical assistance, contributes to the reduction of gender inequality and the realisation of human rights.</p><p class="code-line code-active-line" data-line="20"><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/publications/women-underutilized-assets-critical-review-imf-advice-female-labour-force-participation">Read our report:&nbsp;<em>Women as “underutilized assets”, A critical review of IMF advice on female labour force participation and fiscal consolidation</em></a></p> </div> http://www.actionaid.org/2017/10/women-underutilized-assets#comments Governance Womens Rights International Thu, 12 Oct 2017 12:01:49 +0000 Lovisa.Moller 709724 at http://www.actionaid.org Women as “underutilized assets”: A critical review of IMF advice on female labour force participation and fiscal consolidation http://www.actionaid.org/publications/women-underutilized-assets-critical-review-imf-advice-female-labour-force-participation <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/women-underutilized-assets-critical-review-imf-advice-female-labour-force-participation" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/actionaid_2017_-_women_as_underutilized_assets_-_a_critical_review_of_imf_advice.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="340" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/actionaid_2017_-_women_as_underutilized_assets_-_a_critical_review_of_imf_advice.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>actionaid_2017_-_women_as_underutilized_assets_-_a_critical_review_of_imf_advice.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-10-10T00:00:00+01:00">Tuesday, October 10, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>Deeply-embedded patriarchal norms mean that women have a dual role in the economy: productive and reproductive. This reality – and the failure of governments, businesses and institutions to recognise and address it – mean that women’s unpaid labour is too often exploited or unrecognised, even as it provides a massive subsidy to states and economies. This double burden on women impacts on the type of paid work women can engage in and results in them working longer days than men in nearly all countries.</p><p>This briefing focuses on the IMF’s recent advice aimed at increasing female labour force participation. It calls on the IMF to consider female labour force participation in the context of the work women are doing in total, and highlights that the IMF needs to urgently address the impact of their prescribed macroeconomic policies on women’s opportunities to access decent work, their disproportionate unpaid care burden and their ability to exercise choice over their economic contribution.</p><p><em>The briefing will be presented at the Civil Society Policy Forum at the 2017 World Bank Group / IMF 2017 Annual Meetings, in the session 'Contradicting Commitments: Why Fiscal Space Matters for Women and Work', 9:00 am – 10:30 am, Wednesday, 11 October 2017, in the IMF Headquarters Building 2, Washington D.C. (<a href="http://pubdocs.worldbank.org/en/949081507056218084/17AM-CSPF-Schedule-DAY-2-Wednesday-October-11.pdf">official programme</a>).</em></p> </div> unpaid care work Governance Womens Rights International Mon, 09 Oct 2017 11:00:00 +0000 Rob Safar 709191 at http://www.actionaid.org Promoting localised, women-led approaches to humanitarian responses – A Briefing Note http://www.actionaid.org/publications/promoting-localised-women-led-approaches-humanitarian-responses-briefing-note <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/promoting-localised-women-led-approaches-humanitarian-responses-briefing-note" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/humanitarian_responses_localisation_-_1june2017.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="340" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/humanitarian_responses_localisation_-_1june2017.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>humanitarian_responses_localisation_-_1june2017.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-06-01T00:00:00+01:00">Thursday, June 1, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>Briefing note outlining why <strong>ActionAid is committed to devolving humanitarian response from international to national and local levels, and why we and support women to take on leadership</strong> roles in humanitarian responses.</p><p>For ActionAid, localisation encompasses shifting the power from North to South, international to local and from a male-dominated system to one where women play a more central role. ActionAid advocates for greater attention to women’s rights in emergencies and a more localised response that facilitates shifts in power, resources and gender relations to ‘build back better’ in ways that go beyond material improvements or technical solutions.</p> </div> Emergencies & Conflict Womens Rights International Fri, 29 Sep 2017 14:11:36 +0000 Rob Safar 709064 at http://www.actionaid.org The effects of privatisation on girls’ access to free, quality public education in Malawi, Mozambique, Liberia, Tanzania and Nepal http://www.actionaid.org/publications/effects-privatisation-girls-access-free-quality-public-education-malawi-mozambique-libe <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/effects-privatisation-girls-access-free-quality-public-education-malawi-mozambique-libe" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/the_effects_of_privatisation.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="340" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/the_effects_of_privatisation.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>the_effects_of_privatisation.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-09-07T00:00:00+01:00">Thursday, September 7, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>This report shows how the right to education in Liberia, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania and Nepal is undermined by the low quality of public education. Governments have a duty to ensure the right to free, public education of good quality for all but the low quality of public schools is driving parents to pay for private education. Privatisation aggravates existing inequalities and marginalisation of vulnerable groups and children from poor families. Governments must fulfil their responsibility and ensure free, public education of good quality for all children.</p><p>The right to free, quality education is established by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and reaffirmed with the Sustainable Development Goals. However, despite much progress, the obstacles to achieving free public education for all are still numerous. In recent years, the growing trend of for-profit privatisation within the education sector has emerged as yet another serious challenge. One of the concerns is that it aggravates existing inequalities and marginalisation of vulnerable groups within the education system, as these groups are not able to pay for education. The purpose of this study was to conduct research on the education landscape in five countries (Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Nepal and Liberia) and to analyse the effects of privatisation on girls’ access to free, quality public education in those countries. The study focusses on privatisation at the primary and secondary school level and looks at the different providers of private education, as well as the development in privatisation between 2010 and 2015. The research is based on a desk study, field visits (to Nepal, Malawi, Mozambique, and Tanzania) and interviews with key education stakeholders.</p><ul><li><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/the_effects_of_privatisation.pdf">Download the report</a></li><li><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/malawi_policy_paper.pdf">Download the Malawi policy paper</a></li><li><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/mozambique_policy_paper.pdf">Download the Mozambique policy paper</a></li><li><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/nepal_country_report.pdf">Download the Nepal country report</a></li><li><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/nepal_policy_paper.pdf">Download the Nepal policy paper</a></li><li><a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/tanzania_policy_paper.pdf">Download the Tanzania policy paper</a></li></ul> </div> Education Womens Rights International Thu, 07 Sep 2017 11:03:45 +0000 Rob Safar 707783 at http://www.actionaid.org Gender-Responsive Public Services and Young Urban Women’s Economic Empowerment: A report on research in Ghana and South Africa http://www.actionaid.org/publications/gender-responsive-public-services-and-young-urban-womens-economic-empowerment-report-re <div class="field field-publication-cover-image"> <a href="/publications/gender-responsive-public-services-and-young-urban-womens-economic-empowerment-report-re" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right imagecache-linked imagecache-image_heading_right_linked"><img src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/imagecache/image_heading_right/gender-responsive_public_services_and_young_urban_womens_economic_empowerment_19th_aug.png" alt="" title="" width="240" height="340" class="imagecache imagecache-image_heading_right"/></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-author"> ActionAid </div> <div class="field field-publication-full"> <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/files/actionaid/gender-responsive_public_services_and_young_urban_womens_economic_empowerment_19th_aug.pdf"><img alt="application/pdf icon" src="http://www.actionaid.org/sites/all/modules/filefield/icons/application-pdf.png" /><span>gender-responsive_public_services_and_young_urban_womens_economic_empowerment_19th_aug.pdf</span></a> </div> <div class="field field-publication-date-published"> <span class="date-display-single"><time datetime="2017-09-06T00:00:00+01:00">Wednesday, September 6, 2017</time></span> </div> <div class="field field-publication-overview"> <p>In 2016 we worked with the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) based at the University of Sussex in the UK to conduct a research in Ghana and South Africa to examine the relationship between <a href="http://www.actionaid.org/young-urban-women">young urban women</a>’s economic empowerment and the delivery (or lack thereof) of gender responsive public services (GRPS).</p><p>We looked especially at how this plays out in resource poor settings such as urban informal settlements. The idea is to challenge and expand the current discourse around women’s economic empowerment to ensure that the structural barriers to women’s economic justice are recognised and addressed.</p><p>The findings of this report show very conclusive links between provisioning of public services and young women’s ability to engage in paid work opportunities. It also shows that the provisioning of GRPS is a critical but missing link that has the potential to economically empower young women. Many young women in Ghana and South Africa face multiple barriers to finding and maintaining a job in the formal economy, which reflects poor or lack of access to some essential services. The report forms part of our effort to call attention to the most pressing issues related to young women’s economic security.</p><p>Access to quality, affordable and accessible gender responsive public services is a basic human right and the report puts forward a number of recommendations for duty-bearers towards delivering on this.</p> </div> young urban women Womens Rights International Wed, 06 Sep 2017 12:39:23 +0000 Rob Safar 707664 at http://www.actionaid.org